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Consortium for PCET Annual Conference 2013
in association with Teacher Education in Lifelong Learning (TELL) network

"Policy directions in Teacher Education and Professional Development: implications for FE and Skills practitioners after de-regulation"

Friday, 28th June 2013 at University of Huddersfield (#hudtec13)

 ‌Programme | Abstracts | Photos

UPDATE:
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Also see conference photos.

 

Conference Programme

 

Please note:

  • Workshop options will be available to select on the conference day.
  • See Abstracts for more details on each session.
Timing Sessions
10:00 Registration and Refreshments
10:30 Denise-Robinson Welcome and Introduction
Dr Denise Robinson
National Teaching Fellow, Director Consortium for PCET and HUDCETT
10:40 Jim Crawley Keynote Lecture: 'Desperate Times... Desperate measures' - How can we keep professionalism alive in PCET?
Jim Crawley
Programme Leader, Lifelong Learning, Bath Spa University
Chair of Post 16 Committee, UCET, Founder and convenor of TELL network
11:30 Break
11:45 A1 DanielO'Neill The Profession’s Memory?  History of Education, Teacher Training and the Radicality of the Past
Dr Daniel O’Neill
(Liverpool Community College)
A2 Andrew Wilson Conceptions of Professionalism and Professionality
Andrew Wilson
(Hull College)
A3 HeatherLister JaneBrooke On reflection…’:  enhancing reflective practice through digitally recorded professional discussion
Jane Brooke and Heather Lister(Selby College)
A4 CarolThompson PeterWolstencroft Give 'em the old Razzle Dazzle - Jumping through the Hoops of Lesson Observation in Further Education
Peter Wolstencroft and Carol Thompson(University of Bedfordshire)
12:45 Lunch
13:30 Kevin Orr Robin-Simmons Open Discussions: Led by
Professor Robin Simmons
and
Dr Kevin Orr

(University of Huddersfield)
13:55 B1 Katrina Diamond Professionalism in Post Compulsory Vocational Education and Training- to what extent do historical and social perspectives impact on the perceptions and status of the sector? A comparison between England, Finland and Germany
Katrina Diamond(Gloucestershire College)
B2 CarolDennis 'Occupying the debate' Post 16 professionalism and the vanishing state
Dr Carol Azumah Dennis(University of Hull)
B3 JoelPetrie MaireDaley Can a CPD Revolution Put Practitioners in the Driving Seat?  The Community of Practice Teaching & Learning Strategy
Maire Daley and Joel Petrie(Liverpool Community College)
B4 AnnTemple The Map is Not The Territory. Professional identity and the shifting landscape of Higher and Further Education
Anne Temple Clothier
(Leeds Metropolitan University)
14:55 Plenary
15:15 Evaluation and Close

 

 ‌Programme | Abstracts | Photos

 

Conference Abstracts

KEYNOTE - 'Desperate Times... Desperate measures' - How can we keep professionalism alive in PCET?

Jim Crawley, Bath Spa University

Despite Lingfield's (2012: ii) intention of creating 'an environment in which the professionalism of further education lecturers, instructors, workplace supervisors and assessors might naturally flourish, without interference', what faces most teachers right now is more pressure, more teaching, more responsibility, less time in which to manage any of it, and more interference, not less.

Is professionalism all but dead and is there anything we can do to save it?

This talk will propose that we can take more ownership of our profession but that we must start taking small steps forward before it is too late.


A1. The Profession’s Memory?  History of Education, Teacher Training and the Radicality of the Past

Dr Daniel O’Neill, Liverpool Community College

The increasing assertiveness of the state in controlling the potentialities of education, combined with the reduction of professional autonomy for educational professionals, has moulded an increasingly politicised and singular vision of education.   One of the ways for an ancient practice such as teaching to revitalise itself, and protect itself from such encroachment, is its centuries of tradition, practice and thought.  However the potential of education’s memory has been diminished.  The history of education has been removed from the places of formation of educationalists and has become a minority past time, limited in scope and influence.  The decline in history of education has been accompanied by the diminishment of philosophy of education in teacher formation cutting away the humanist base of teacher education departments.  In this paper, I draw from Skinner, Gadamer and Rorty in arguing for the radicality of the past in offering a critique of contemporary practices and keeping the educational conversation open.

A2. Conceptions of Professionalism and Professionality

Andrew Wilson, Hull College

Delegates will be asked to consider their attitudes and opinions towards professionalism and how it influences their approach to teaching in HE in FE.  Common sense definitions will be compared and contrasted with accepted conceptions to investigate their usefulness.  Sociological models of professional practice will be introduced and analysed to assess their utility in measuring and defining a working view of professionalism.

Professionality as a separate but related concept will be explored with delegates assessing to what extent they possess a restricted or extended orientation.  This will be followed by a review of professional competencies and their boundaries.

The aim of the workshop is to encourage delegates to assess and evaluate what professionalism and professionality means to them and how it influences their daily interactions with relevant stakeholders.

A3. ‘On reflection…’:  enhancing reflective practice through digitally recorded professional discussion

Jane Brooke and Heather Lister, Selby College

Can the use of digitally recorded professional discussions capture trainees’ classroom critical incidents in a more honest and meaningful way than traditional written reflections?  This workshop will evaluate the use of the spoken mode over the written mode as a means of promoting effective reflective practice.

A4. Give 'em the old Razzle Dazzle - Jumping through the Hoops of Lesson Observation in Further Education

Peter Wolstencroft and Carol Thompson, University of Bedfordshire

The use of Quality Assurance measures, often characterised by an increase in surveillance of teacher activity via formal, graded observation schemes, has had a significant impact on the professional lives of FE tutors. Lesson observation schemes are typically presented as a form of quality improvement by managers, yet are described by tutors in terms of measurement and control with an outcome of generating a "conform and perform" culture. Drawing on interviews with a range of stakeholders, this research challenges the underlying assumptions that the measurement of teacher performance has a positive impact on teaching and learning overall.


B1. Professionalism in initial teacher training for vocational education and training in the post 16 sector- a comparison of England, Finland and Germany

Katrina Diamond, Gloucestershire College

Vocational Education and Training is currently high on the European Agenda and is believed to be a key vehicle for up-skilling the workforce and creating economic success and productivity .The session will briefly look at the roots of vocational education and training in England, Finland and Germany and the extent to which political and social systems have impacted on the status and training of teachers for the sector. To what extent do qualifications and regulatory requirements for the sector impact on perceptions of professionalism and status of the sector?

B2. 'Occupying the debate' Post 16 professionalism and the vanishing state

Dr Carol Azumah Dennis, University of Hull

After ten exhilarating and exhausting years, FE professionalism has found the policy spotlight is now focussing in another direction. With the skills agenda abandoned, the sector is now positioned as marginal. Arguably, this might also be a potential space for vibrancy; one in which we can reassert our own values as post 16 teachers and managers. My discussion of FE takes place within the context of austerity, within an approach to welfare fashioned on 16th C poor laws. In these times when policy making seems driven by a nostalgic melancholic longing for a lost social order, I want to explore whether it is possible for those of us committed to lifelong learning to occupy the debate and make our issues matter.

B3. Can a CPD Revolution Put Practitioners in the Driving Seat?  The Community of Practice Teaching & Learning Strategy

Maire Daley and Joel Petrie, Liverpool Community College

This LSIS funded project was a response to Frank Coffield’s and Bill Williamson’s advocacy of communities of discovery.  A teaching and learning strategy informed by lecturer and student input was developed; designed to encourage a dialogue between individuals and teams about curriculum developments and CPD.  Lecturers were encouraged to reflect on practice, consider curriculum changes, and participate in identifying associated CPD required.  Managers were tasked with leadership of this renewed professional learning by collating the CPD findings to inform staff development planning, and ultimately to establish Pillar specific CPD plans.  The overarching finding emerging from the project is that the process could have the capacity to act as a vehicle for lecturers to engage in a journey of CPD self-identification focusing on teaching and learning.  However, several key barriers also emerged which need to be addressed; including competing professional demands, the credibility of the project in shifting culture, and a lack of CPD parity for part time and agency staff.

B4. The Map is Not The Territory. Professional identity and the shifting landscape of Higher and Further Education

Anne Temple Clothier, Leeds Metropolitan University

This workshop explores some of the issues currently impacting on the teaching practices of academics, the changing psychological contract, and the multidimensional aspects of professional representation. It considers some of the tensions and challenges faced when ‘plotting a route’ on a shifting landscape.

 ‌Programme | Abstracts | Photos

 

Conference Photos

 

 ‌Programme | Abstracts | Photos

Last updated Wednesday 10 July 2013
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